Tag Archives: coffee

Coffee Beans

My earliest coffee experience was at 6. I didn’t drink it, but instead, poured it over fried rice for breakfast.  I can’t imagine discovering this on my own, so I am guessing that I saw someone do it first:  Kapeng Barako (Batangas coffee: liberica beans) on rice, crispy dried fish, and sunny side up. It was a favorite weekend treat for me.

We didn’t have a coffee maker back then.  We used a percolator, or sometimes just a pot of boiling water where we let the ground beans steep.

Despite this very early introduction to caffeine, I didn’t pick up drinking coffee until after college, and even then it was an occasional dessert coffee. Starbucks and similar coffee shops were my hang out places after a late night movie.  I would make an afternoon trip there too when I got bored working at home.

I still get to sneak in a Starbucks run once in a while

Now, I am a regular morning coffee drinker.  I enjoy drinking it black, sometimes with a bit of demerara sugar.  In cafes, I order mocha, non-fat, no whip.

From a non-coffee drinker 10 years ago, I have managed to be a coffee aficionado where I grind my own beans every morning.   On one of my trips back to Manila, I brought back dalawang salop* na Kapeng Barako from Lipa.  I got a fancy espresso machine for my wedding, so I  indulge on cappuccinos on weekends.

My children cringe at the thought of pouring coffee over fried rice.  I don’t blame them, but I can’t deny that I loved it when I was younger.

Kapeng Barako

Boiling water
Brown sugar
Ground barako beans

Put brown sugar in a pot of boiling water.  Add ground coffee and beans and remove from heat.  Steep for 5 minutes.  Pour through a sieve to minimize latak (coffee sediment).

*salop is a unit of measurement equivalent to a kilogram

Barako is a tagalog word which means strong or tough man.  Kape means coffee.

Kapeng barako is a common name for liberica coffee beans grown in Lipa and other high places in Batangas. Because of the coffee’s strong taste, it got the name kapeng barako.

Coffee

Posted on

After cooking up a storm in the kitchen, I like to make my dessert simple and easy to prepare. After all, who would want to labor for dinner, and then labor some more for dessert?

Coffee Jelly is one of the easiest desserts to make. The ingredients are always in any well-stocked kitchen: unflavored gelatin, coffee, and Vanilla ice cream.

During my dating days in Manila, coffee desserts at Dean St. Café were my favorite. It has been so long, but I think the dessert that I always ordered was Vienna Velvet.  It was a thick drink concoction– coffee jelly in a tall glass with soft vanilla ice cream.

Those who still remember Dean St. Café, and know what I am talking about, please drop a comment and set me straight.  After all, it has been more that two decades since I set foot in that place.

Coffee Jelly Ice Cream

1 pack of unflavored gelatin
2 tbsp hot water
2 cups strong black coffee
2 tbsp sugar (optional)
Vanilla ice cream

Brew strong black coffee. In a shallow pan or Pyrex, mix gelatin with hot water. Gradually mix in hot coffee. Stir to completely dissolve the gelatin. Sugar can be added at this time. Put in the refrigerator until set.

Cut the gelatin in cubes. Soften vanilla ice cream in a tall glass, and gently fold in the cubed coffee gelatin. For fancier presentation, serve with whipped cream and chocolate sprinkles.