Cooking with Chocolate

Posted on

Everyone who knows my family well knows that my son’s favorite breakfast is champorado.  It is made with sweet sticky rice, water, and chocolate.  Everything is boiled together until porridge consistency.  Depending on the kind of chocolate used, sugar can be omitted or added.

I can’t remember when I first cooked it for my son, but I am sure he had it even before I allowed him to eat sweets.  I would let him eat as many bowls of champorado as he wants, and yet I would not allow him to eat a single chocolate bar.  It does not make sense, I know.  I was convinced then, that by allowing him to eat champorado, I was helping him create a memory of enjoying a Filipino dish that would last him a lifetime.

If we were in Manila, we would eat champorado with crispy dried fish–tuyo, danggit, or sap-sap (my favorite).  The contrast of the saltiness of the fish compliments the sweetness of the chocolate meal.  Although I could find a variety of dried fish in the local oriental store, I have yet to try one processed in California.  Instead, I use another complimentary side dish–Bacon!   I broil applewood smoked bacon to a crisp.  It offers that same balance in taste as the salty fish (obviously, with more cholesterol).

I have used Antonio Pueo’s tablea and Bohol Bee Farm tablea.  Good friends who know that champorado is a favorite of ours have brought tablea from Palawan and Davao as pasalubong (thanks, Raquel).  But if in a bind, I use plain and simple chocolate chips (Ghirardelli, Hershey’s, Trader Joe’s).  They work just as well.

Champorado

1 cup sweet sticky rice

4-5 cups of water

2-3 pcs of tablea or 6 oz of chocolate chips (dark or regular)

In a pot, bring everything to a boil.  Stir regularly to prevent the rice from sticking to the bottom of the pot.  Once rice is cooked (approximately 20 minutes), turn off heat.  Because of the glutinous rice, the mixture will become very thick (malapot) after it cools.  Mixing a little bit of milk will help with the sticky consistency. Condensed milk is perfect to be used if tablea is the chocolate preference.  Otherwise, use regular or non-fat milk.

About Teacher Tina

I have been a teacher for more than 15 years in the Philippines and the United States. Teaching is a vocation that I am grateful to have embraced. It certainly prepared me for motherhood.

6 responses »

  1. Champorado with bacon? Masubukan… I love mine with kesong puti from Calbayog (Samar). Comfort food!

    Reply
  2. I am not a fan of champorado… But i love chocolates alot. My mom cooks it on a sunday for breakfast at least once or twice a month. Waking up with the smell of fried tuyo all over the house is what makes me eat a little. I just want to share how my mom cooks champorado. She usually use tablea most of the time as her cocoa base. One time,we run out of tablea…since she was craving to eat champorado, she saw a box of Carnation Hot Cocoa Mix in the pantry. She grab a couple of packets and mixed it in the boiling sticky rice. When i tasted it…. Aba at masarap nga naman !!! Then she said to me “no need to add sugar & milk… Timplado na yan ! ” So there you have it… an alternative & pinaka instant way to cook champorado… Hot cocoa mix & sticky rice.🙂

    Reply
    • Amazing what we can come up with to satisfy our cravings! Nothing beats the smell of salty fried fish in the morning, specially if I am not the one cooking it🙂. The smell of it for me, ranks up there with the aroma of freshly brewed coffee. Thanks for sharing!

      Reply
  3. My friend married to an English guy couldnt explain what champorado was and in exasperation said “it’s like chocolate risotto”!!! Now, you know how limited my cooking skills are so Selina has grown up on traditional oats (not quick cooking ones) mixed with Milo as her Aussie Champorado…not bad you say? I could’ve ‘copyrighted’ it as next thing you know, my lovely client Nestle (makers of Milo) have now launched a MILO OATS. Ha!

    Reply
    • You should have! The next time you come up with a brilliant and time saving idea, make sure to patent it. We have used steel cut oats too as an alternative to the sweet sticky rice. Chocolate chips melt quickly melt away in the bowl.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: